Netanyahu vows to return Israeli embassy official at center of Jordanian crisis

Tuesday, 25 Jul, 2017

It said one of the workers, identified by Israeli media as a 17-year-old, attacked an Israeli security guard with a screwdriver.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged to de-escalate a diplomatic crisis with Jordan following yesterday's shooting at Israel's embassy in Amman, during which two Jordanian attackers were shot dead by an Israeli security guard.

The kingdom's Public Security Directorate said the incident happened in a residential building in the compound in Jordan's capital.

Cleric Ikrema Sabri said on Monday that a lawyer for the Muslim leadership met Sunday with Jerusalem police chief Yoram Halevi, and heard a response to Muslim demands.

Israel shut off the mosque compound on July 14 after Arab Israelis attacked and killed two police officers nearby.

Muslim leaders alleged Israel was trying to expand its control at the site under the guise of security, a claim Israel has denied.

President Abbas has suspended all contacts between the Palestinian Authority and the Israeli government on Friday in protest of the metal detectors. Jordanian government officials were not immediately available for comment.

The incident came at a time of heightened tension in the region over a Jerusalem holy site.

According to the Vienna Convention of 1961 the security man has immunity from investigation and arrest, the Israeli foreign ministry said.

Speaking about regional developments in the crisis over Jerusalem's Temple Mount and the shooting at Israel's embassy in Amman, Livni said serious leadership is needed in Israel.

Media reports citing security sources say one person is dead and one injured.

The father of the teen assailant reportedly told a Jordanian television station that he does not believe his son meant to attack an Israeli.

Israel has said the metal detectors were a needed security measure to prevent future attacks.

Israel lifted a gag order Monday imposed the night before.

A large proportion of Jordanians have Palestinian origins, with the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics putting their number at 3.24 million in 2009, or more than half the population.