Ibuprofen Use Linked to Male Infertility, New Study Suggests

Wednesday, 10 Jan, 2018

Researchers even tested ibuprofen on "bits of human testes" collected from organ donors and saw the same result: The drug hampered testosterone output. The scientist tested aspirin, Tylenol and ibuprofen.

The study, which took place in Denmark and France, involved 31 men under the age of 35.

The decreased ratio of testosterone to LH created a hormonal imbalance called "compensated hypogonadism" in the endocrine system, which regulates and controls hormones.

The small study, which was published yesterday (Jan. 8) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that men who took 1,200 milligrams of ibuprofen a day for six weeks developed a hormonal condition that is linked with reproductive problems.

Luteinizing hormones are secreted by the pituitary gland and stimulate the testicles to produce testosterone. "Ibuprofen puts a severe damper on testosterone production, so the brain has to kick in", said David Møbjerg Kristensen, a senior researcher at the Copenhagen's main hospital, Rigshospitalet.

"It is also associated with depression and increased risk for cardiovascular events, including heart failure and stroke".

Participants were split into two groups, with 14 receiving 600mg of ibuprofen twice a day two weeks before and 30 days after an exercise session, and the other acting as a control.

'But the effects on the adult man remain largely unknown. Inhibition of testosterone levels was found to be significant and dose-dependent after 24 and 48 hours of ibuprofen exposure (in doses which corresponded to the oral doses used in the trial).

The study also investigated several other hormones produced by the testes that were found to be reduced by ibuprofen. The consistency of the results, however, as well as the earlier epidemiological results, suggest that there might really be an issue here.

A popular pain medication often popped by men who suffer minors aches and pains related to sports may be linked to infertility, according to a new study.

Jegou agreed that more study is needed to answer a number of questions, including how low doses of ibuprofen affect male hormones and whether long-term effects are reversible, CNN reported.

Before now, he says, "most warnings regarding this family of painkillers have focused on limiting long-term use in the elderly to prevent gastrointestinal, renal and cardiac adverse effects".